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Sciatic Nerve Pregnancy

 

Sciatic Nerve Pregnancy

Sciatic Nerve Pregnancy

Sciatic nerve pregnancy does not sound like anything good. And it is not because it can cause a shooting pain in the lower back which can radiate to the buttocks and down to the lower part of the leg. If you have sciatic nerve pregnancy or sciatica during pregnancy, to be more precise you may also experience tingling, burning sensation or pins-and-needles in your leg, or numbness along the sciatic nerve which runs from the spine through the buttocks to the soles of your feet. Sciatic nerve pain is usually experienced on one side of the body. Sciatic nerve pregnancy is believed to be caused by the pressure of the growing baby on the sciatic nerve in the later stages of pregnancy which explains why it most often affects women during their 3rd trimester. However, sciatica can also be caused by a number of non-pregnancy related factors such as herniated disc, injury and a variety of medical conditions involving the spine. But if you have started experiencing sciatic nerve pain during your 3rd trimester, it probably is not a sign of an underlying medical condition although it is a good idea to have it checked by your doctor.

Unfortunately, there is not much you can do about sciatica during pregnancy other than to hope that it will resolve quickly. It usually does go away with simple self-care measures within a few weeks although it sometimes persists until delivery or a little bit longer. Believe it or not but exercise and stretching are among the best ways to deal with sciatic nerve pain which is why you should seriously consider starting with exercise, of course, if you have a non-complicated pregnancy and if your doctor agrees. Just as important is to pay attention to your posture, and to avoid lifting any heavy objects and standing for prolonged periods of time. Some women also report finding relieve with prenatal massage and alternative treatments such as acupuncture. Both are generally safe for pregnant women but make sure to ask your doctor for approval and choose a well trained and certified practitioner if you decide for alternative treatments. Also, wear flat soled shoes or shoes with only slightly elevated heel (whichever suits you best) because high heels put an additional strain on your sciatic nerve and worsen the pain.

When you experience that shooting pain, lay down or walk if you can, or at least alternate resting and walking because the pain often goes away sooner if you move. You can also use ice packs or hot packs to alleviate the pain, or ask your doctor if it is OK to take a pain reliever, which one, and how much and long is it safe to take it. However, be sure to contact your doctor if the mentioned sciatica self-care measures do not provide relief, if the pain is getting worse or if you are not sure what is causing the pain.

 
 

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