Nausea During Pregnancy

Nausea During Pregnancy

Nausea during pregnancy, better known as morning sickness is experienced by nearly all pregnant women in some degree. It is one of the first signs of pregnancy and it is possible to experience it even before a missed period because it can start as early as two weeks after conception. Like its name suggests, it tends to be worse in the morning but it can strike at any time during the day and even during the night. In addition to feeling nauseated and miserable, it is also possible to experience vomiting. It remains unclear what causes morning sickness but some health experts believe that it may be related to a hormone called human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) the levels of which start rising rapidly almost immediately after conception. Nausea during pregnancy can interfere with your excitement about being pregnant but in most cases, it is not serious and does not pose any health risks to the mother nor the baby even if it is accompanied by vomiting. On the contrary, research suggests that it may even reduce the risk of pregnancy loss. However, there is no reason to worry if you do not experience morning sickness because you are perhaps among those very few women who seem to be immune to the pregnancy-related physiological changes.

Morning sickness is a normal part of being pregnant but in rare cases, it can be a sign of complications. About 1 percent of pregnant women develop a severe form of nausea called hyperemesis gravidarum which is accompanied by severe vomiting. Severe morning sickness can also signal molar pregnancy, an abnormal pregnancy in which a mole (abnormal tissue) begins to grow inside the uterus. However, this abnormal pregnancy is accompanied by other symptoms which reveal that there is a problem such as vaginal spotting or bleeding and passing grape-like tissue. If you think that you may have symptoms of molar pregnancy, you should immediately visit your doctor because the abnormal tissue in your uterus can cause serious complications if not removed promptly. You are also highly recommended to contact your doctor if you cannot keep liquids down more than 24 hours, if you are vomiting blood or if you have signs of dehydration (reduced urination or passing small amounts of dark-colored urine, dizziness, rapid heartbeat).

Although nausea during pregnancy usually is not serious, you are highly recommended to drink plenty of liquids especially if it is accompanied by vomiting to prevent dehydration. Nausea can also interfere with your appetite, however, you need only about 150 extra calories during early pregnancy and by the time you will need a higher caloric intake, the morning sickness will improve or go away completely although it sometimes persists throughout the entire pregnancy. Unfortunately, there are no sure ways to prevent it nor make it go away before the beginning of the second trimester. Meanwhile, you can try to alleviate nausea by identifying and avoiding its triggers (there are non-food triggers too, just for the record) and eat smaller but more frequent meals. But if you cannot find any relief or if you think that you have an abnormally severe nausea, contact your doctor.