Baby Burping

Baby Burping

Baby burping is almost as important as baby feeding and should be given almost as much attention. This is due to the fact that a big burp after each feeding sounds comforting to the parents who almost feel as good as they would have a burp themselves. But on the other hand, not all babies are “burpers“ and there is no reason to be concerned if you do not hear that burp after each feeding. Burping is a way to get rid of the air that is swallowed during feeding. However, to be able to get rid of that air, most babies need some help. There are generally three methods that can be used to encourage your baby to burp. The most popular one is to hold your baby over the shoulder and gently tap his or her back until you finally hear that burp. Since spitting up is not uncommon with babies, it is a good idea to place a towel on your shoulder in case your baby will have a “wet“ one. Do not expect a burp immediately, though. Sometimes babies burp in a matter of seconds after being placed in an upright position but other times they need more time. In addition, this position may not work every time nor for every baby. If your little one does not seem to like this baby burping position or if he or she does not burp within a few minutes, you can also try holding him or her in a sitting position or face downward on your lap. Feel free to experiment but make sure that your baby’s head and neck are always well supported.

The air that is swallowed during feedings can cause discomfort to your baby and lead to crankiness but it can also cause gas or spitting up. Ideally, you should make sure that your baby has a burp after each feeding as well as during the feedings when he or she is taking a break. However, there is no need to worry if your baby does not have a burp after each feeding. As already mentioned earlier, not all babies are big burpers. In addition, they eventually learn to swallow less air when eating and do not need to burp as frequently, while those who are fed with their head higher than their stomach tend to swallow less air. So do not worry if your baby does not burp when you think he or she should. Your baby perhaps did not swallow as much air but even if he or she did, that air will come out one way or another.

There is no need to bother yourself with baby burping too much because you will quickly learn to identify the “I need to burp“ sign. You do not need to be concerned about occasional spitting up either. It is most often caused by immaturity of the muscle that is responsible for keeping the stomach content in the stomach or air bubbles in the esophagus pushing the milk back up. However, if you think that your baby spits up too often or/and too much, please contact your baby’s doctor.