7 Month Old Baby

7 Month Old Baby

You will probably notice that your 7 month old baby is unusually upset when left alone with strangers (stranger anxiety) and when you leave the room. It feels good seeing your baby exited when entering the room but this behavior known as separation anxiety can be very frustrating too. Your may have a hard time taking a shower or even going to the toilet without your baby protesting about it. Your baby’s reluctance to be separated from you will be particularly apparent when waking up during the night because babies with separation anxiety will not calm down until being comforted. This behavior is very common and typically fades within a few months.

What To Expect:
Your 7 month old baby will be more independent that a month earlier and may be even able to sit unsupported. However, babies at 7 months of age are still not completely mobile. As a result of inability to reach a desired toy or object, they may experience frustration and stress. Do not jump to help immediately though. Instead of handing over your baby the desired item, encourage him or her to get it on his or her own to stimulate his or her motor skills. You can expect your baby to start crawling by the age of 7 months. However, there is no need to be concerned if your baby does not seem to show interest in crawling because some babies skip this part completely. Give your baby enough room and allow him or her to choose how to move around on his or her own. By the age of 7 months, your baby should be eating a variety of solid foods although it is not unusual for babies to suddenly reject foods they already accepted. Keep in mind that forcing your baby to eat particular foods will not help and may have the opposite effect. Continue to introduce new foods and be patient. Also, allow your baby to decide how much to eat on his or her own and be sure to offer foods that are rich in essential nutrients.

What You Need To Know:
You can expect the first tooth to appear now that your baby is 7 months old. Most babies start teething at the age of 6 months but it is not uncommon not to get their first tooth by the age of 12 months or older. It remains unknown whether teething is causing pain but it seems to be uncomfortable in certain extent for most babies. Rub your baby’s gums with a clean finger or apply a cold washcloth to your baby’s gums. If your baby seems to be in great pain, ask your doctor if it is OK to give him or her a pain reliever. Be sure to take your baby to his or her pediatrician if he or she develops fever or diarrhea, or refuses to eat. The mentioned symptoms are sometimes claimed to be related to teething, however, they can also signal an illness. For that reason you should have your baby examined by his or her pediatrician to rule out other causes of the usual symptoms or receive treatment if necessary. Encourage your baby to wash hands, especially before eating. However, try not to make everything sterile because many scientists believe that allergies such as atopic dermatitis and asthma could be related to insufficient exposure to microorganisms during early childhood.

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