1 Month Old Baby

1 Month Old Baby

Caring for 0 to 1 month old baby is both rewarding and challenging. You will probably feel both thrilled and terrified about becoming a mom, especially if it is your first child. Do not worry, your feelings are completely normal. After all, you are recovering from labor, not getting enough sleep, struggling to learn breastfeeding properly and trying to figure out what your baby’s cry is supposed to mean because the crying is not only signaling “I want to eat“ although it does not necessarily mean that something is wrong either.

What to Expect:
The first month after birth is not only a major change for you. While you are getting used to your baby and his or her needs, your baby is getting used to life outside your womb. Do not be surprised if your newborn does not resemble a little angel at first. Pressure on the face during childbirth can result in puffy or swollen eyes, your baby’s head may be cone-shaped, his or her skin may be dry and peeling, he or she may have tiny white pimples on the face known as milia, while the back, shoulder and temples can be covered by fine, downy hair known as lanugo. All this is normal and there is no need to worry about it because he or she will transform into the most beautiful baby you have ever seen before 1 month of age. Crying is the only mode of communication of an 1 month old baby, so you better prepare yourself for lots of crying. It may be difficult to figure out at first what your baby is trying to say but you will eventually learn the meaning of different types of crying. But in the case of an 1 month old baby crying usually means that he or she is hungry. Prepare yourself to breastfeed your baby every 2 to 3 hours. If you replace 4 to 6 wet diapers per day, you do not have to worry about your baby not receiving enough milk.

What You Need To Know:
Babies do not have the neck strong enough to support the head by the age of 1 month, so be sure to support the head with your hand while lifting him or her. Until the umbilical cord falls off on its own, stick to sponge baths and avoid the temptation of pulling it off even if it hangs on only by a thread. Expect for the stump to change colors but if you notice persistent swelling or discharge, contact your doctor because it may be a sign of infection. Babies are born with a sucking instinct and seem most happy when given something to suck. Keep in mind, however, that the American Academy of Pediatrics does not recommend introduction of pacifier before the age of 1 month and before breastfeeding is well established. Do not hesitate to reject ill people from approaching your baby because his or her immune system is not fully developed yet. Babies cannot roll over at the age of 1 month but you should still never leave your baby unattended on a changing table or other high surfaces. If you have any questions about your baby’s health or breastfeeding or if you suspect an illness, do not hesitate to call your doctor.

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